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U.S. President Barack Obama Proclaims September 2013 As National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month — What Should You Know?

Posted by Paul Cacciatore on August 31, 2013

Yesterday, U.S. President Barack Obama designated September 2013 as National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month. “… During National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, we lend our support to everyone touched by this disease, we remember those we have lost, and we strengthen our resolve to better prevent, detect, treat, and ultimately defeat ovarian cancer…. This month, we extend a hand to all women battling ovarian cancer. We pledge our support to them, to their families, and to the goal of defeating this disease. …”

WhiteHouse-LogoYesterday, U.S. President Barack Obama designated September 2013 as National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month. The Presidential Proclamation is reproduced in full below.

During National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, Libby’s H*O*P*E*™ will honor the women who have lost their lives to the disease, support those who are currently battling the disease, and celebrate with those who have beaten the disease. This month, medical doctors, research scientists, and ovarian cancer advocates renew their commitment to develop a reliable early screening test, improve current treatments, discover new groundbreaking therapies, and ultimately, defeat the most lethal gynecologic cancer.

Let us begin this month with several important facts relating to ovarian cancer. Please take time to review these facts — they may save your life or that of a loved one.

didyouknow

Ovarian Cancer Facts

Lethality. Ovarian cancer causes more deaths than any other cancer of the female reproductive system.

Statistics. In 2013, the American Cancer Society (ACS) estimates that there will be approximately 22,240 new ovarian cancer cases diagnosed in the U.S. ACS estimates that 14,030 U.S. women will die from the disease, or about 38 women per day or 1-to-2 women every hour. This loss of life is equivalent to 28 Boeing 747 jumbo jet crashes with no survivors — every year.

Signs & Symptoms. Ovarian cancer is not a “silent” disease; it is a “subtle” disease. Recent studies indicate that women with ovarian cancer are more like to experience four persistent, nonspecific symptoms as compared with women in the general population, such as (i) bloating, (ii) pelvic or abdominal pain, (iii) difficulty eating or feeling full quickly, or (iv) urinary urgency or frequency. Women who experience such symptoms daily for more than a few weeks should seek prompt medical evaluation. Note: Several other symptoms have been commonly reported by women with ovarian cancer. These symptoms include fatigue, indigestion, back pain, pain with intercourse, constipation and menstrual irregularities. However, these additional symptoms are not as useful in identifying ovarian cancer because they are also found in equal frequency in women within the general population who do not have the disease.

Age. Although the median age of a woman with ovarian cancer at initial diagnosis is 63, the disease cancer can afflict adolescent, young adult, and mature women. Ovarian cancer does not discriminate based upon age.

Prevention. Pregnancy, breastfeeding, long-term use of oral contraceptives, and tubal ligation reduce the risk of developing ovarian cancer.

Risk Factors.

  • BRCA Gene Mutations. Women who have had breast cancer, or who have a family history of breast cancer or ovarian cancer may have increased risk. Women who test positive for inherited mutations in the BRCA-1 or BRCA-2 gene have an increased lifetime risk of breast and ovarian cancer. A women can inherit a mutated BRCA gene from her mother or father. Women of Ashkenazi (Eastern European) Jewish ancestry are at higher risk (1 out of 40) for inherited BRCA gene mutations. Studies suggest that preventive surgery to remove the ovaries and fallopian tubes in women possessing BRCA gene mutations can decrease the risk of ovarian cancer.
  • Lynch Syndrome. An inherited genetic condition called “hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer” (also called “Lynch syndrome“), which significantly increases the risk of colon/rectal cancer (and also increases the risk of other types of cancers such as endometrial (uterine), stomach, breast, small bowel (intestinal), pancreatic, urinary tract, liver, kidney, and bile duct cancers), also increases ovarian cancer risk.
  • Hormone Therapy. The use of estrogen alone menopausal hormone therapy may increase ovarian cancer risk. The longer estrogen alone replacement therapy is used, the greater the risk may be. The increased risk is less certain for women taking both estrogen and progesterone, although a large 2009 Danish study involving over 900,000 women suggests that combination hormone therapy may increase risk. Because some health benefits have been identified with hormone replacement therapy, a women should seek her doctor’s advice regarding risk verses benefit based on her specific factual case.
  • Smoking. Smoking has been linked to an increase in mucinous epithelial ovarian cancer.

Early Detection. There is no reliable screening test for the detection of early stage ovarian cancer. Pelvic examination only occasionally detects ovarian cancer, generally when the disease is advanced. A Pap smear cannot detect ovarian cancer. However, the combination of a thorough pelvic exam, transvaginal ultrasound, and a blood test for the tumor marker CA-125 may be offered to women who are at high risk of ovarian cancer and to women who have persistent, unexplained symptoms like those listed above. This early detection strategy has shown promise in a 2013 University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center early detection study involving over 4,000 women. Importantly, another large ovarian cancer screening trial that is using similar early detection methods is under way in the United Kingdom, with results expected in 2015. The U.K. study is called “UKCTOCS” (UK Collaborative Trial of Ovarian Cancer Screening) and involves over 200,000 women aged 50-74 years.

Treatment.

  • Treatment includes surgery and usually chemotherapy.
  • Surgery usually includes removal of one or both ovaries and fallopian tubes (salpingo-oophorectomy), the uterus (hysterectomy), and the omentum (fatty tissue attached to some of the organs in the belly), along with biopsies of the peritoneum (lining of the abdominal cavity) and peritoneal cavity fluid.
  • In younger women with very early stage tumors who wish to have children, removal of only the involved ovary and fallopian tube may be possible.
  • Among patients with early ovarian cancer, complete surgical staging has been associated with better outcomes.
  • For women with advanced disease, surgically removing all abdominal metastases larger than one centimeter (debulking) enhances the effect of chemotherapy and helps improve survival.
  • For women with stage III ovarian cancer that has been optimally debulked, studies have shown that chemotherapy administered both intravenously and directly into the abdomen (intraperitoneally) improves survival.
  • Patients can enter clinical trials at the start of, during the course of, and even after, their ovarian cancer treatment(s).
  • New types of treatment are being tested in ovarian and solid tumor clinical trials, including “biological therapy” and “targeted therapy.” For example, these types of treatment can exploit biological/molecular characteristics unique to an ovarian cancer patient’s specific tumor classification, or better “train” the patient’s own immune system to identify and attack her tumor cells, without harming normal cells.

Survival. 

  • If diagnosed at the localized stage, the 5-year ovarian cancer survival rate is 92%; however, only about 15% of all cases are detected at an early stage, usually fortuitously during another medical procedure. The majority of cases (61%) are diagnosed at a distant or later stage of the disease.
  • Overall, the 1-, 5-, and 10-year relative survival of ovarian cancer patients is 75%, 44%, and 34%, respectively.
  • The 10-year relative survival rate for all disease stages combined is only 38%.
  • Relative survival varies by age; women younger than 65 are twice as likely to survive 5 years (56%) following diagnosis as compared to women 65 and older (27%).

Help Spread the Word To “B-E-A-T” Ovarian Cancer

Please help us “B-E-A-T” ovarian cancer by spreading the word about the early warning signs & symptoms of the disease throughout the month of September.

beatlogo_308x196B = bloating that is persistent and does not come and go

E = eating less and feeling fuller

A =abdominal or pelvic pain

T = trouble with urination (urgency or frequency)

Women who have these symptoms almost daily for more than a few weeks should see their doctor. Prompt medical evaluation may lead to detection at the earliest possible stage of the disease. As noted above, early stage diagnosis is associated with an improved prognosis.

__________________________________________________________

The White House

Office of the Press Secretary

For Immediate Release August 30, 2013

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION

obama_signingEach September, America calls attention to a deadly disease that affects thousands of women across our country. This year, over 22,000 women will develop ovarian cancer, and more than half that number of women will die of this disease. During National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, we lend our support to everyone touched by this disease, we remember those we have lost, and we strengthen our resolve to better prevent, detect, treat, and ultimately defeat ovarian cancer.

Because ovarian cancer often goes undetected until advanced stages, increasing awareness of risk factors is critical to fighting this disease. Chances of developing ovarian cancer are greater in women who are middle-aged or older, women with a family history of breast or ovarian cancer, and those who have had certain types of cancer in the past. I encourage all women, especially those at increased risk, to talk to their doctors. For more information, visit www.Cancer.gov.

My Administration is investing in research to improve our understanding of ovarian cancer and develop better methods for diagnosis and treatment. As we continue to implement the Affordable Care Act, women with ovarian cancer will receive increased access to health care options, protections, and benefits. Thanks to this law, insurance companies can no longer set lifetime dollar limits on coverage or cancel coverage because of errors on paperwork. By 2014, the health care law will ban insurers from setting restrictive annual caps on benefits and from charging women higher rates simply because of their gender. Additionally, insurance companies will be prohibited from denying coverage or charging higher premiums to patients with pre-existing conditions, including ovarian cancer.

This month, we extend a hand to all women battling ovarian cancer. We pledge our support to them, to their families, and to the goal of defeating this disease.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim September 2013 as National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month. I call upon citizens, government agencies, organizations, health care providers, and research institutions to raise ovarian cancer awareness and continue helping Americans live longer, healthier lives. I also urge women across our country to talk to their health care providers and learn more about this disease.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirtieth day of August, in the year of our Lord two thousand thirteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-eighth.

BARACK OBAMA

__________________________________________________________

Sources:

  • Cancer Facts & Figures 2013. Atlanta: American Cancer Society; 2013 [PDF file].
  • Presidential Proclamation — National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2013, Office of the Press Secretary, The White House, August 30, 2013.
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6 Responses to “U.S. President Barack Obama Proclaims September 2013 As National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month — What Should You Know?”

  1. […] U.S. President Barack Obama Proclaims September 2013 As National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month &#82… (healthinfoispower.wordpress.com) […]

  2. Gina McCrann said

    So encouraging to see more awareness of Ovarian Cancer especially with this September Proclamation. My sister-in-law passed away from Clear Cell Ovarian Cancer in November 2012. On her behalf and in her memory I thank you.

    • Thank you so much Gina for your comment. I am so sorry to hear about the passing of your sister-in-law in November 2012 from the lethal subtype of epithelial ovarian cancer known as “clear cell.” Having lost my 26-year old cousin Libby in July 2008 from the same subtype of ovarian cancer, I share in your feeling of great loss. But, I also feel a sense of optimism about the research progress in the area of ovarian clear cell cancer (OCCC). I work closely with the Doug and Diana Gray Ovarian Clear Cell Carcinoma Research Resource (OCCC Research Resource), an 8-year research project dedicated to fully understanding, and ultimately beating, OCCC. To the best of my knowledge, it is the largest international research project dedicated to a specific subtype of epithelial ovarian cancer. Unfortunately, this research will take time and money. Unfortunately, this research did not save your sister-in-law or my cousin Libby.

      But, I am convinced that OCCC will ultimately be beaten. In fact, a recent drug known as “ENMD-2076″ has shown great promise within a small group of OCCC patients. In addition, there are several additional novel treatment approaches that also show promise. I know that Libby’s H*O*P*E* will keep fighting in the memory of your sister-in-law and Libby, while continuing to help other OCCC survivors and their family members on a one-on-one basis who are in the midst of their fight.

      Gina, thank you again for the kind words and know that Libby’s H*O*P*E* will not rest until OCCC is beaten in the name of those women whose lives were cut short by this lethal form of ovarian cancer. We will continue to fight and we will keep you and your sister-in-law in our thoughts and prayers.

      Warmest regards,
      Paul Cacciatore
      Founder, Libby’s H*O*P*E*

  3. Teresa Fischer said

    Thank you Mr. President. I am in remission 3 years, 9 months, for this disease. I’d never heard of it until I was diagnosed. This means a lot to us women who fight it.

    • Teresa, I simply want to thank you for posting your comment. Congrats on the nearly 4 year period of remission. So many of the ovarian cancer survivors that we communicate with also never heard about the disease until initial diagnosis. I would encourage you to find your “own voice” as an ovarian cancer advocate in this fight, if you have not already done so.

      It is important for our readers to understand that the U.S. Government funds almost 90% of all ovarian cancer research conducted in the U.S. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) funds almost $100 million of ovarian cancer research per year. The Department of Defense has funded between $10 million and $30 million of ovarian cancer research per year for the past 12 years. The Ovarian Cancer National Alliance has done an excellent job of protecting, while always fighting to increase, this critical research funding on behalf of ovarian cancer survivors and their family members.

      Thank you again for stopping by, and please do so again in the near future. I wish you all the best during National Ovarian Awareness Cancer Awareness Month and beyond.

      Warmest regards,

      Paul Cacciatore
      Founder, Libby’s H*O*P*E*

  4. Mary Young said

    Thank you…i am battling this as we.speak…again thank you for tbe awareness

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