A Weekly Combination of Topotecan & Docetaxel Produces Clinical Benefit In Heavily Pretreated Ovarian Cancer Patients

Recurrent and metastatic endometrial and ovarian cancers can be notoriously difficult to treat. … Physicians at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University showed that a combination of two chemotherapy drugs not only produced clinical benefit for such patients but were also well tolerated.  The results of this phase II study were published online in Gynecologic Oncology on March 21st. …[T]he researchers concluded that the combination of weekly topotecan and docetaxel has clinical benefit and is well tolerated in this heavily treated epithelial ovarian and uterine cancer patient population.  The researchers also noted that patients with platinum-resistant tumors had clinical benefit and should be considered for further study with this regimen. …

Recurrent and metastatic endometrial and ovarian cancers can be notoriously difficult to treat.  Both diseases are capable of  spreading to other organs and developing resistance to chemotherapy.  Typically, under this scenario, the patients have been heavily treated with chemotherapy and may not be able to endure additional treatment. Physicians at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University showed that a combination of two chemotherapy drugs not only produced clinical benefit for such patients but were also well tolerated.  The results of this phase II clinical study were published online in Gynecologic Oncology on March 21st.

Mark H. Einstein, M.D., M.S., Associate Professor of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Women's Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University

Mark H. Einstein, M.D., M.S., Associate Professor of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Women's Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University

“Women with recurrent gynecologic cancers have often had multiple rounds of chemotherapy, which can cause tumor cells to develop resistance to these drugs,” says Mark H. Einstein, M.D., M.S., Associate Professor of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Women’s Health at Einstein, who headed the study. “This resistance can make it difficult for doctors to devise a treatment protocol that will impact the cancers while avoiding the often-severe side effects that certain chemotherapy drugs can cause, particularly when patients have already been heavily pretreated with other anti-cancer drugs.”Under the trial protocol, eligible patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian or uterine cancers were treated with weekly topotecan 3.5 mg/m(2) and docetaxel 30 mg/m(2) for 3 consecutive weeks. Cycles were repeated every 4 weeks for 6 cycles or until evidence of disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Patient response was assessed under Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST) or, when appropriate, Rustin’s Criteria.  The majority of patients had received 2 prior chemotherapy regimens (9 pts had received 1 previous regimen, 16 pts. had received 2, 1 pt. had received 3, and 1 pt. had received 4).  Of the twenty-seven patients registered, 24 were evaluable for response.  The results of the trial are set forth below.

  • 86 cycles of chemotherapy were administered.
  • There were three grade 4 (all neutropenia) and ten grade 3 toxicities.Six of the grade 3 toxicities were unrelated to treatment.
  • There were 8 dose delays and 4 dose reductions.
  • The overall response rate was 25%  (8% CR, 17% PR).
  • The clinical benefit rate was 38% (8% CR+17% PR+13% SD).
  • The median duration of response was 8.5 months (range 3-19 months).
  • The median overall survival was 18.5 months (range 1.8-50.7 months.

Based upon the foregoing results, the researchers concluded that the combination of weekly topotecan and docetaxel has clinical benefit and is well tolerated in this heavily treated epithelial ovarian and uterine cancer patient population.  The researchers also noted that patients with platinumresistant tumors had clinical benefit and should be considered for further study with this regimen.Compared with previous clinical trials, an unusually high proportion of these women had been heavily pretreated with chemotherapy─yet nearly 40 percent of them experienced clinical benefit. In addition, the overall survival with the drug combination (median survival of 18.5 months) was higher than in previous phase II studies that evaluated the drugs on an individual basis.  Finally, there were few and relatively mild side effects from the drug combination compared with toxicities observed in similar studies.

The effectiveness and safety outcomes of the trial are “promising enough to justify a larger clinical study of this drug combination for women with recurrent gynecologic cancers,” Dr. Einstein said.

Other researchers at Einstein involved in the trial were Divya Gupta, M.D., Ricky L. Owers, M.D., Mimi Kim, Sc.D., Dennis Yi-Shin Kuo, M.D., Gloria S. Huang, M.D., Shohreh Shahabi, M.D., and Gary L. Goldberg, M.D. Dr. Einstein’s research was funded, in part, by investigator-initiated grants from Sanofi-Aventis and GlaxoSmithKline Oncology for research-related trial costs.

Sources:

Sometimes More Is Less: Evaluation of Experimental Platinum-Based Treatment Regimens in Advanced-Stage Ovarian Cancer; A Phase III Trial of the Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup

“… Compared with standard paclitaxel and carboplatin, addition of a third cytotoxic agent [gemcitibine, liposomal doxorubicin or topotecan] provided no benefit in PFS [progression-free survival] or OS [overall survival] after optimal or suboptimal cytoreduction. Dual-stage, multiarm, phase III trials can efficiently evaluate multiple experimental regimens against a single reference arm. The development of new interventions beyond surgery and conventional platinum-based chemotherapy is required to additionally improve outcomes for women with advanced EOC.”

“Michael A. Bookman,* Mark F. Brady, William P. McGuire, Peter G. Harper, David S. Alberts, Michael Friedlander, Nicoletta Colombo, Jeffrey M. Fowler, Peter A. Argenta, Koen De Geest, David G. Mutch, Robert A. Burger, Ann Marie Swart, Edward L. Trimble, Chrisann Accario-Winslow, and Lawrence M. Roth

From the Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA; Gynecologic Oncology Group Statistical and Data Center, Buffalo, NY; Franklin Square Hospital; Baltimore, MD; Guy’s Hospital, London, United Kingdom; Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ; Australia New Zealand Gynaecological Oncology Group, Camperdown, Australia; European Institute of Cancer Research, Milano, Italy; Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; University of Minnesota School of Medicine, Minneapolis, MN; University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA; Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO; University of California, Irvine Medical Center, Orange, CA; University College London and Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Unit, London, United Kingdom; National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD; and Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN.

* To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: michael.bookman@fccc.edu

Purpose: To determine if incorporation of an additional cytotoxic agent improves overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) for women with advanced-stage epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) and primary peritoneal carcinoma who receive carboplatin and paclitaxel.

Patients and Methods: Women with stages III to IV disease were stratified by coordinating center, maximal diameter of residual tumor, and intent for interval cytoreduction and were then randomly assigned among five arms that incorporated gemcitabine, methoxypolyethylene glycosylated liposomal doxorubicin, or topotecan compared with carboplatin and paclitaxel. The primary end point was OS and was determined by pairwise comparison to the reference arm, with a 90% chance of detecting a true hazard ratio of 1.33 that limited type I error to 5% (two-tail) for the four comparisons.

Results: Accrual exceeded 1,200 patients per year. An event-triggered interim analysis occurred after 272 events on the reference arm, and the study closed with 4,312 women enrolled. Arms were well balanced for demographic and prognostic factors, and 79% of patients completed eight cycles of therapy. There were no improvements in either PFS or OS associated with any experimental regimen. Survival analyses of groups defined by size of residual disease also failed to show experimental benefit in any subgroup.

Conclusion: Compared with standard paclitaxel and carboplatin, addition of a third cytotoxic agent provided no benefit in PFS or OS after optimal or suboptimal cytoreduction. Dual-stage, multiarm, phase III trials can efficiently evaluate multiple experimental regimens against a single reference arm. The development of new interventions beyond surgery and conventional platinum-based chemotherapy is required to additionally improve outcomes for women with advanced EOC.”

Quoted Source Evaluation of New Platinum-Based Treatment Regimens in Advanced-Stage Ovarian Cancer: A Phase III Trial of the Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup; Bookman MA et. al., J Clin Oncol. 2009 Feb 17. [Epub ahead of print].

2009 Society of Gynecologic Oncologists Annual Meeting Ovarian Cancer Highlights

From February 5th through 8th, 2009, the Society of Gynecologic Oncologists’ (SGO) held its 40th Annual Meeting on Women’s Cancer in San Antonio, Texas. The meeting, viewed as the preeminent scientific and educational conference for women’s cancer care specialists, featured more than 350 scientific oral and poster presentations as well as educational sessions dealing with advances in the care and treatment of women’s cancers.

40thsgobanner2

From February 5th through 8th, 2009, the Society of Gynecologic Oncologists‘ (SGO)  held its 40th Annual Meeting on Women’s Cancer in San Antonio, Texas.  The meeting, viewed as the preeminent scientific and educational conference for women’s cancer care specialists, featured more than 350 scientific oral and poster presentations as well as educational sessions dealing with advances in the care and treatment of women’s cancers.  Several important presentations relating to ovarian cancer were made during the meeting and are highlighted below:

  • SGO: IVF Confers Slight Long-Term Risk of Ovarian Cancer, by Charles Bankhead, Medical News from SGO: Society of Gynecologic Oncologists Meeting, February 6, 2009 [Presentation Source:  Burger C, et al; The risk of borderline and invasive ovarian tumors after ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization in a large Dutch cohort after 15 years of follow-up, SGO 2009; 112(Suppl 1): Abstract 6].
  • SGO: Optimal Surgery Holds Benefits in Ovarian Cancer with Upper Abdominal Disease, by Charles Bankhead, Medical News from SGO: Society of Gynecologic Oncologists Meeting, February 6, 2009 [Presentation Source:  Zivanovic O, et al; Upper abdominal disease cephalad to the greater omentum and the impact on progression-free survival in patients with stage IIIC ovarian cancer;  SGO 2009; 112(Suppl 1): Abstract 1].
  • SGO: Rectovaginal Nodules Predict Bowel Perforation Risk with Bevacizumab, by Charles Bankhead, Medical News from SGO: Society of Gynecologic Oncologists Meeting, February 9, 2009 [Presentation Source:  Richardson DL, et al; Which factors predict bowel complications in patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer being treated with bevacizumab? SGO 2009; 112(Suppl 1): Abstract 41].
  • Low Completion Rates for GOG 172 Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy Regimen: See Aletti G, et al Intraperitoneal chemotherapy for ovarian cancer: Exploring the “dark side” of the moon” SGO 2009; 112(Suppl 1): Abstract 40 (Source:  SGO: Few Ovarian Cancer Patients Tolerate Intraperitoneal Regimen, by Charles Bankhead, Medical News from SGO: Society of Gynecologic Oncologists Meeting, February 11, 2009).
  • Vermillion Presents Critical Data From Its OVA1 Clinical Trial, Vermillion Inc. News Release, February 10, 2009 [Presentation based upon a study entitled, A biomarker panel for distinguishing between malignant and benign ovarian tumors, which was co-authored by Fred Ueland, MD, Associate Professor of Gynecologic Oncology at the University of Kentucky and Principal Investigator of the OVA1 clinical trial, and Zhen Zhang, PhD, Associate Professor of Pathology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine as well as Vermillion scientists].

About the Society of Gynecologic Oncologists

The SGO is a national medical specialty organization of physicians who are trained in the comprehensive management of women with malignancies of the reproductive tract. Its purpose is to improve the care of women with gynecologic cancer by encouraging research, disseminating knowledge which will raise the standards of practice in the prevention and treatment of gynecologic malignancies, and cooperating with other organizations interested in women’s health care, oncology and related fields. The Society’s membership, totaling more than 1280, is primarily comprised of gynecologic oncologists, as well as other related medical specialists including medical oncologists, radiation oncologists and pathologists. SGO members provide multidisciplinary cancer treatment including chemotherapy, radiation therapy, surgery and supportive care. More information on the SGO can be found at http://www.sgo.org.

Non-Platinum Topotecan Drug Combination Therapy Provides No Survival Advantage Over Topotecan Monotherapy

“In women with recurrent ovarian cancer, treatment with topotecan along with etoposide or gemcitabine offers no survival advantage over topotecan monotherapy, German and Austrian researchers report in the July 1st issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology.”

“In women with recurrent ovarian cancer, treatment with topotecan along with etoposide or gemcitabine offers no survival advantage over topotecan monotherapy, German and Austrian researchers report in the July 1st issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

‘Combination therapies,’ lead investigator Dr. Jalid Sehouli told Reuters Health, ‘were associated with higher toxicity, but progression-free survival and overall survival were not significantly different.’

Dr. Sehouli, of Humboldt University in Berlin, and colleagues explain in their paper that although topotecan monotherapy is an established treatment, there was evidence to suggest that combination therapy may provide better results.

To investigate further, the researchers studied 502 women in whom ovarian cancer recurred following primary surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy. They were randomized to receive either topotecan alone or in combination with etoposide or gemcitabine.

Median overall survival was not significantly different among the groups: 17.2 months with topotecan alone, 17.8 months with the etoposide combination and 15.2 months with the gemcitabine combination. There were no differences in either median progression-free survival or objective response rates.

The researchers note that the incidence of thrombocytopenia was lower with monotherapy (13.5%) than with the etoposide combination (21.5%) or gemcitabine combination (31.3%), and they conclude that combination therapy increases toxicity and does not provide a survival advantage.

‘Based on our results,’ Dr. Sehouli warns, ‘physicians should not harm their patients with such combination regimens.’”

Quoted Source: Topotecan Combo No Extra Help in Ovarian Cancer, by David Douglas, Matria Healthcare News, July 28, 2008 (summarizing the findings of Nonplatinum topotecan combinations versus topotecan alone for recurrent ovarian cancer: results of a phase III study of the North-Eastern German Society of Gynecological Oncology Ovarian Cancer Study Group; Sehouli J et. al., J Clin Oncol. 2008 July;26(19):3176-82.

Additional Information:

2008 ASCO Annual Meeting Abtracts Highlight Several Drugs That Show Promise Against Drug Resistant Ovarian Cancer

There were several drugs highlighted in clinical trial abstracts presented at the 2008 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting that demonstrated varying degrees of effectiveness against drug resistant (i.e., recurrence within 6 to 12 months after completion of first line treatment) and/or drug refractory (i.e., recurrence within 6 months after completion of first line treatment) ovarian cancer. By “effectiveness,” we mean generally that the drug or drug combination produced a complete response, partial response, and/or disease stabilization (and in a few cases, a significant drop in the CA-125 tumor marker) in ovarian cancer tumors. To better understand how to intrepret a medical study abstract, click here. The 2008 ASCO Annual Meeting was held in Chicago, Illinois on May 30 – June 3, 2008.

A list of the drugs/drug combinations is provided below. Any drug covered in depth through an earlier H*O*P*E*™ weblog post is noted. We also included 2008 ASCO Annual Meeting abstracts that provide “solid tumor” clinical trial results with respect to studies that enrolled patients with ovarian cancer tumors. When evaluating the potential enrollment in a clinical trial at various treatment points, an ovarian cancer survivor should evaluate trials dedicated to ovarian cancer patients in entirety, as well as general “solid tumor” trials that allow enrollment of ovarian cancer patients. Generally, a patient should give first priority to dedicated ovarian cancer trials and use the solid tumor trials as a “backup” to the ovarian cancer trials. All questions regarding the priority assigned to, or proper sequencing of, clinical trials should be discussed in detail with your doctor(s). Treatment priority and sequencing issues arise, for example, when enrollment in one clinical trial potentially disqualifies the patient for a subsequent second clinical trial based upon the protocol (i.e., inclusion/exclusion criteria) of the second trial. This example assumes that both clinical trials are currently enrolling patients when trial enrollment is being evaluated by you and your doctor.

Abbreviation Legend:

ABSTR=2008 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting Abtract; ASCO=American Society of Clinical Oncology; CA-125=cancer antigen 125; CEA=Carcinoembryonic Antigen (Tumor Marker); CR=Complete Response; CT=Computed Tomography

CTC=Common Toxicity Criteria; DCE-MRI=Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging; DLT=Dose Limiting Toxicity; DP=Disease Progression; EOC=Epithelial Ovarian Cancer; G=Grade of Adverse Drug Effect;

GCIG=Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup; GOGGynecologic Oncology Group; MTD=Maximum Tolerable Dose; mg/m²=milligrams per metre squared; NCI=National Cancer Institute; OR=Objective Response; OS=Overall Survival;

PET=Positron Emission Tomography Scanning; PK=Pharmacokinetics; PO=Oral Administration; PR=Partial Response; PFS=Progression Free Survival; RECIST=Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors; RR=Response Rate; SD=Stable Disease

SNS-595 (Voreloxin®):

NOV-002 & Carboplatin (Paraplatin®):

  • NOV-002 plus carboplatin in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer (2008 ASCO Abstract #5593). Patients were heavily pretreated with 11/15 patients having received 3 prior [treatment] lines. Toxicity was mild-moderate with no G4 toxicity. There was no febrile neutropenia. The most common toxicities were nausea and fatigue, as well as abdominal pain and bowel obstruction thought to be related to underlying disease. To date, there is 1 patient with PR, 7 patients with SD and 5 patients with PD, with 1 patient off-trial for patient discretion. PFS is 14 weeks. Patients tolerated this regimen extremely well, with most toxicity attributable to carboplatin alone. Conclusion: The PFS was longer than expected, with a significant proportion of these platinum resistant patients achieving clinical benefit with prolonged stable disease. [61% disease control (CR+PR+SD) rate]

Picoplatin & Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin (Doxil®):

  • Final results of a phase I study of picoplatin and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin [e.g. Doxil™] in advanced solid tumor malignancies (2008 ASCO Annual Mtg. Abstr. #2568 ): Picoplatin is a novel, sterically hindered platinum(II) complex designed to circumvent mechanisms of platinum resistance. Given the single agent activity seen in multiple tumor types, we conducted a phase I study of picoplatin in combination with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) in patients with advanced solid tumors. The Phase 1 trial enrolled 16 patients with advanced solid tumors who had received up to three prior regimens for metastatic disease. Patients were administered picoplatin followed by liposomal doxorubicin on day one of a 28-day cycle. Four dose levels of picoplatin and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin were tested: 100/20, 100/30, 100/40 and 120/40 (all mg/m2). A total of 62 courses of treatment were delivered to 16 patients with a median number of four cycles per patient. A total of 12 patients were evaluable for response. One patient experienced a CR (primary peritoneal cancer) and four experienced a PR (including three of five patients with ovarian cancer). Hematologic and non-hematologic toxicity were mild. Conclusion: This study suggests that picoplatin and liposomal doxorubicin is an active combination with promising results and can be given at standard dose levels with a minimal increase in toxicity. [41% disease control (CR+PR+SD) rate among evaluable patients]

Weekly Topotecan (Hycamtin™) Monotherapy:

  • Phase II study of weekly topotecan in recurrent ovarian cancer: duration of response based on a prolonged follow-up (ASCO Annual Mtg. Abstr. #16549). Nineteen patients (median age 52 yrs, range 45-72) with EOC who progressed after 3 (11/19 patients = 57.9%), 4 (7/19 patients= 36.8%) or 5 (1/19 patients= 5.3%) previous lines of chemotherapy were treated with Topotecan at the dose of 2.0 mg/m2 via a 30-minute intravenous infusion once every week until disease progression, unacceptable toxicity or when a stability of disease was reached. Results: All patients were evaluable for toxicity and clinical response. 16/19 patients enrolled (84.2%) had stage III-IV disease. Median number of chemotherapy cycles was 7 (range 3 – 12). A total of 107 cycles were administered. Dose reduction was necessary for 13% of the cycles. Main toxicities included anemia (G1-G2=57.9%), leucopenia (G1-G2=15.8%), thrombocytopenia (G1-G2=10.5%) and asthenia (20%). No one showed a CR, while 5/19 patients experienced a PR (26.4%), 6/19 patients experienced SD (31.5%), and 8/19 patients (42.1%) experienced DP. The median PFS was 12 weeks in patients with PR; SD was maintained for a median time of 14 weeks. Conclusion: The rate of patients with ongoing stable disease (31.5%) suggests that the clinical benefit of weekly topotecan may be expected also in patients with no other viable therapeutic options. [57% disease control (CR+PR+SD) rate among evaluable patients]

Azacitidine & Carboplatin:

Combretastatin A4 Phosphate (Zybrestat™) and Bevacizumab (Avastin™):

BSI-201:

Belinostat (PXD101):

SU11248/Sunitinib (Sutent®):

AZD2281 (KU-0059436):

  • AZD2281, a PARP (poly ADP-ribose polymerase) inhibitor with single agent anticancer activity in patients with BRCA deficient ovarian cancer: Results from a phase I study (2008 ASCO Annual Mtg. Abstr. #5510) Thirty-two patients with BRCA-deficient ovarian cancer (i.e., patients with BRCA gene mutations) the majority of whom were platinum resistant/refractory are so far evaluable for response. All evaluable patients had either received treatment for at least 8 weeks (2 cycles) or progressed prior to completion of 2 cycles. Fourteen patients have achieved PR, 13 patients meeting GCIG- CA125 criteria and 10 patients meeting RECIST criteria. Of the responders, 1 patient has been on drug > 56 weeks whilst 7 patients have maintained responses for > 24 weeks. SD was seen in an additional 8 patients, 7 of whom continue on drug and 3 patients had SD > 16 weeks. Responses were seen at all dose levels from 100mg bd and above. Conclusion: AZD2281 is well tolerated and has demonstrated compelling activity in patients with BRCA deficient ovarian cancer. Responses were seen in all patient groups including platinum resistant disease. Updated efficacy data, together with a correlation of potential predictive factors including platinum free interval will be presented on a total planned cohort of 46 patients with BRCA-deficient ovarian cancer. A randomised study in BRCA-deficient ovarian cancer has been planned. [68% disease control (CR+PR+SD) rate among evaluable patients]

Gemcitibine (Gemzar™) & Epirubicin (Ellence™):

Belinostat/PXD101, Carboplatin (Paraplatin®) & Paclitaxel (Taxol™):

Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin (Doxil®) & Gemcitabine (Gemzar®):

Pemetrexed/LY231514 (Altima®):

Sorafenib (Nexavar™):

  • Phase II trial of sorafenib in persistent or recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) or primary peritoneal cancer (PPC): A Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) study (2008 ASCO Annual Mtg. Abstr. #5537). Sorafenib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting raf and other receptor kinases (VEGF-R, PDGF-R, Flt3, c-KIT). Sorafenib may have anti-angiogenic activity through inhibition of VEGF-R. This phase II study was conducted to assess the activity and tolerability of sorafenib in patients with recurrent EOC. Methods: This was an open label multi-institutional phase II study …. Eligible patients had persistent or recurrent EOC/PPC after 1-2 prior cytotoxic regimens, measurable or detectable (e.g. by CA125) disease, and GOG performance status < 2. Patients were required to have progressed within 12 months of completing platinum based therapy. Treatment consisted of sorafenib 400 mg orally bid until disease progression or prohibitive toxicity. Primary endpoints were PFS at 6 months and toxicity by NCI criteria. Secondary endpoints were tumor response and duration of PFS/OS. Results: 73 patients were enrolled from 10/04 to 5/07 and as of 12/2007, 68 patients are evaluable (2 ineligible and 3 too early) for toxicity. Median age was 60 (range 33-80) years and prior treatment consisted of 1 regimen in 40 patients and 2 regimens in 28 patients. Significant G3 and G4 toxicities included: rash (12 patients), metabolic (10 patients), gastrointestinal (3 patients), cardiovascular (2 patients), and pulmonary (2 patients). No treatment related deaths were recorded. Only patients with measurable disease were used to assess efficacy. Among the 59 patients with measurable disease, 12 survived PFS at least 6 months. Three patients are yet to be determined. Two patients had PR; 20 had SD; 30 had DP, and 7 could not have their tumor assessed. Conclusions: Preliminary results suggest that sorafenib is tolerated in patients with recurrent EOC with dermatologic and metabolic abnormalities being the most common toxicities. Efficacy data is expected to reach maturity and be analyzed in the spring of 2007, and comprehensive results will be presented. [42% disease control (CR+PR+SD) rate among evaluable patients]

Topotecan (Hycamtin™) & Bevacizumab (Avastin™):

  • Phase II prospective study of weekly topotecan and bevacizumab in platinum refractory ovarian cancer or peritoneal cancer (OC) (2008 ASCO Annual Mtg. Abstr. #5551). Patients (pts) with platinum refractory OC have limited treatment options. Bevacizumab, an anti-angiogenesis agent has demonstrated efficacy in recurrent ovarian cancer. Bevacizumab combined with chemotherapy in other solid tumors has improved efficacy compared with bevacizumab or chemotherapy alone. Topotecan, an active drug in recurrent OC has been used in a weekly fashion with less toxicity and more acceptability than a standard 5 day regimen. Topotecan and bevacizumab have non-overlapping toxicities. We studied the efficacy and tolerability of weekly topotecan and bevacizumab in patients with platinum refractory OC. Methods: The primary objectives of this study were to evaluate PFS, OS, OR rate and toxicity of this combination regimen. Eligible pts included those with platinum refractory OC (recurrence < 6 months of platinum therapy) who had received a maximum of 2 prior chemotherapy regimens. Results: Twenty-two pts have been enrolled to date, with 11 pts remaining on study and 18 now evaluable. Best responses for the 18 evaluable pts were: 22.2% PR (n=4), 27.8% SD (n=5), and 50% DP (n=9). Eleven pts went off study due to DP (based on CT scan RECIST criteria [n=6] or general deterioration and/or bowel obstruction [n=5]). Median duration on study for the 18 evaluable pts was 15 wks (range 5-63 weeks). Four pts have had PFS >5 months. The 18 evaluable pts received a total of 91 treatment cycles. No pt went off study due to treatment related toxicity or suffered a bowel perforation. Conclusions: Combination bevacizumab and topotecan administered in a weekly fashion demonstrate good activity in platinum refractory OC with acceptable toxicity. G3-G4 Hematologic or Hypertensive Toxicities. [50% disease control (CR+PR+SD) rate among evaluable patients]

Lapatinib (Tykerb™), Carboplatin (Paraplatin®) & Paclitaxel (Taxol™):

  • Phase I/II lapatinib plus carboplatin and paclitaxel in stage III or IV relapsed ovarian cancer patients (2008 ASCO Annual Mtg. Abstr. #5556). The purpose of this study was to establish the MTD and evaluate DLTs and response to therapy of combination therapy with carboplatin/paclitaxel and lapatinib, an oral dual tyrosine kinase inhibitor of both ErbB1 and ErbB2, in Stage III /IV relapsed ovarian cancer. Methods: This was an open-label, multicenter, phase I/II study of carboplatin/paclitaxel in combination with single agent lapatinib in Stage III/IV relapsed ovarian cancer patients. Measurable disease, adequate organ function and ECOG performance status of 0-2 were required. Results: 25 ovarian cancer patients are enrolled and four are too early to be evaluable. The median age is 57 (range 39-81). The median number of prior therapeutic regimens is 4 (range 1-10). GI toxicities were primarily < grade 2 and were successfully treated with aggressive bowel management. 10 patients (pts) experienced G3 toxicities. 4 pts- leukopenia, 2 pts-neutropenia, 2 pts-hyperglycemia, 2 pts-allergic reactions to carboplatin, 1 pt-thrombocytopenia, 1 pt-lymphopenia, 1 pt-hypokalemia, 1 pt-nausea, 1 pt-diarrhea, 1 pt-bowel obstruction. Response to therapy to date is: CR=21%, PR=29%, SD=29%, PD=21%. Two patients who were in complete remission both stopped IV chemotherapy and were maintained only with lapatinib. One is still in remission after six months and one relapsed. Conclusions: Lapatinib, an oral targeted molecular therapy which inhibits both EGFR 1 and 2 tyrosine kinase activity, can be safely administered with a weekly regimen of carboplatin and paclitaxel in heavily pretreated, ovarian cancer patients. The high response rates seen warrant further investigation. [79% disease control (CR+PR+SD) rate among evaluable patients]

Ifomide, Epirubicin, & Cisplatin:

NKTR-102 (Pegylated irinotecan):

  • Phase I dose finding and pharmacokinetic study of NKTR-102 (PEGylated irinotecan): Early evidence of anti-tumor activity (2008 ASCO Annual Mtg. Abstr. #13518 ). NKTR-102 is a novel pegylated form of irinotecan with superior efficacy against a range of xenografts compared with irinotecan. Sustained tumor inhibition is associated with increased SN38 exposure. A phase I trial of NKTR-102 was conducted to establish the MTD and to characterize safety and PK in patients (pts) with refractory solid tumors. No CTC Grade 4 toxicity was observed. G3 diarrhea was dose limiting. Other toxicities included transient uncomplicated G3 neutropenia and transient infusion related visual disturbance. PK data are available for 12 pts. Two partial responses were observed in pts with advanced cervical cancer and small cell lung cancer. Anti-tumor activity was seen in 4 other pts; ovarian: CA-125 decreased from 2557 to 518, Hodgkin’s disease: 28% radiologic improvement with symptomatic benefit, adrenocortical: cortisol levels normalized, metabolic response by PET, esophageal: CEA decreased from 35.5 to 13.6, metabolic response by PET. Conclusions: NKTR-102 shows early evidence of activity in a wide spectrum of tumors. Cumulative SN38 exposure is 1.2 to 6.5 fold higher than that predicted for irinotecan. Toxicity is manageable; diarrhea (not neutropenia) is dose limiting.

ON 01910.Na:

  • Phase I study of ON 01910.Na, a novel polo-like kinase 1 pathway modulator, administered as a weekly 24-hour continuous infusion in patients with advanced cancer (2008 ASCO Annual Mtg. Abstr. #2515). ON 01910.Na induces G2/M cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and cell death in a broad spectrum of cancer cells, but not in non-neoplastic cells. In vitro, cell killing is dependent on drug exposure time. Based on these preclinical findings, a weekly 24hr continuous infusion (CI) study to determine safety and MTD of ON 01910.Na was initiated. Methods: Patients with advanced cancers received ON 01910.Na as a weekly 24hr CI. Twenty-three pts (7:16 M:F, 45-80 yrs) have received ON 01910.Na. G2 toxicities (2-grade increase over baseline) included fatigue (3 pts) and anorexia (1 pt). Fatigue (11/23 pts) was the most common side effect, with no G3 or greater fatigue observed. Overall, three G3 events occurred, none of which were drug-related. The best response was a pt with advanced ovarian cancer who maintained stable disease for 36 wks of treatment. Conclusions: ON 01910.Na is well tolerated as a weekly 24h continuous infusion. In the dose range studied, the drug exhibited non-linear kinetics with rapid attainment of plasma concentrations that are cytotoxic to cancer cells in vitro, but have limited end-organ toxicity in vivo. Study data continues to accrue, and we expect to recommend a phase II dose shortly. Further analysis and combination phase I studies are planned.

BAY 73-4506:

  • Phase I study of BAY 73-4506, an inhibitor of oncogenic and angiogenic kinases, in patients with advanced solid tumors: Final results of a dose-escalation study (2008 ASCO Annual Mtg. Abstr. #2558 ). BAY 73-4506 is a potent tyrosine kinase inhibitor of receptor tyrosine kinases (VEGFR, PDGF, RET, KIT, FGFR) and serine/threonine kinases (raf and p38MAPK). In tumor xenograft models, BAY 73-4506 demonstrated a broad spectrum antitumor activity. Methods: This phase I study was a dose-escalation trial investigating the safety, PK, and pharmacodynamic (PD) profile of BAY 73-4506, given orally in 21 days on/7 days off cycles, until discontinuation due to toxicity or tumor progression. PK was assessed on days 1 and 21 of cycle 1. PD markers including DCE-MRI, soluble VEGFR-2 (sVEGFR-2) and VEGF plasma levels were assessed at each cycle. Tumor response was evaluated as per RECIST. Results: 52 patients (pts) with solid tumors and progressive disease were enrolled and treated with doses of 10 to 220 mg once daily. Frequent tumor types included colorectal cancer (CRC) (31%), malignant melanoma (10%), and ovarian cancer (10%). The median treatment duration was 49.5 days (min. 3, max. 609). Drug-related adverse events (AEs) of all grades reported in >20% of pts were hoarseness (54%), dermatological toxicities (50%; CTC G3-G4: 13%), mucositis (35%), diarrhea (25%; CTC 3: 2%), fatigue (23%; CTC 3: 2%), and hypertension (23%; CTC 3: 6%). Treatment-related AEs leading to dose reduction, interruption or discontinuation were hand foot skin reaction (15%), diarrhea (8%), and thrombopenia (6%). Of the 33 evaluable pts, 9% achieved a partial response (PR), 64% had stable disease (SD), at least 7 weeks after start of treatment, and 48% had SD or PR for more than 11 weeks. Conclusions: The recommended phase II dose for BAY 73-4506 is 160 mg daily, using the 21 days on/7 days off treatment schedule. Clinical activity (PR+SD) has been demonstrated in 73% of the evaluable pts. An extension cohort (dose level 160 mg) has been started.

Thalidomide Provides Hope to Women Diagnosed with Ovarian Cancer When Combined with Topotecan

“We found that patients who received topotecan plus thalidomide showed an overall response rate of 47 percent compared to 21 percent response in patients who received only topotecan”‘ [Levi]Downs[Jr., M.D.] said. “In patients receiving topotecan plus thalidomide, 30 percent achieved a complete response, meaning the cancer went away, compared to 18 percent for patients only getting topotecan.” “Furthermore, patients getting topotecan plus thalidomide had a longer cancer-free period after treatment than those receiving topotecan alone,” he said.

Thalidomide, a drug blamed in the 1950s for causing birth defects, is now showing promise as a safe and effective treatment for women with recurrent ovarian cancer, according to a study led by a University of Minnesota Cancer Center researcher.

Levi Downs, Jr., M.D., principal investigator for the multicenter, randomized Phase II clinical trial, has published the findings of this research study in the current issue of the journal Cancer. Downs is an assistant professor and a researcher of gynecologic oncology at the University of Minnesota Medical School and Cancer Center.

‘For some women, ovarian cancer has become a chronic disease,’ Downs said. ‘The standard chemotherapy regimens can put recurrent cancer in remission, often more than once. However, when the cancer resists the standard treatments, we need new options for treatment.’

The study compared the effectiveness and safety of the combination of thalidomide and topotecan, a chemotherapy often used for ovarian cancer, versus topotecan alone for treatment of recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer in patients who had received prior treatment. Epithelial ovarian cancer is a disease in which cancer cells form in the tissue that covers the ovary.

The study evaluated 75 women who were randomly assigned to receive either the combination of thalidomide and topotecan or only topotecan. This is the first randomized clinical trial to test thalidomide for recurrent ovarian cancer. Other clinical trials have shown thalidomide to be effective for treatment of multiple myeloma, a cancer of the bone marrow.

‘We found that patients who received topotecan plus thalidomide showed an overall response rate of 47 percent compared to 21 percent response in patients who received only topotecan,’ Downs said. ‘In patients receiving topotecan plus thalidomide, 30 percent achieved a complete response, meaning the cancer went away, compared to 18 percent for patients only getting topotecan.’

‘Furthermore, patients getting topotecan plus thalidomide had a longer cancer-free period after treatment than those receiving topotecan alone,’ he said. ‘What all of this means is that while thalidomide may not cure ovarian cancer, it may broaden the treatment options available to physicians and provide more hope to women diagnosed with the cancer.’

Ovarian cancer is the fifth most common cancer among women. This year in the United States, more than 25,000 women will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer, and about 16,000 will die from it. About 78 percent of women diagnosed with the cancer survive one year after diagnosis, and more than 50 percent survive five years after diagnosis.

The results of this study have led to the development of a new clinical trial at the University of Minnesota that will test the safety and effectiveness of a newer member of the class of drugs containing thalidomide properties for treatment of recurrent ovarian cancer.

This study was sponsored by Celgene Corporation, biopharmaceutical company and manufacturer of thalidomide. Cancer centers in Minnesota, Ohio, South Dakota, and California participated in this study.

[Quoted Source: Thalidomide provide more hope to women diagnosed with Ovarian Cancer, by Jennifer Davis, TopCancerNews.com, April 12, 2008.]